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o f
A r c h i t e c t u r a l   E d u c a t i o n




Board of Architectural Educaion
Board of Architectural Educaion
Board of Architectural Educaion
Board of Architectural Educaion
Board of Architectural Educaion
Board of Architectural Educaion
Board of Architectural Educaion

Archives 2014





BAE-IAP Second Hods Roundtable Conference – March 2014




(The summary has been extracted from an article previously published in Archi Times during the year 2014. Ar. Aasma Talat has authored the original article.)
The second HoD Roundtable Conference was held in Islamabad on the 15th of March 2014, where 20 schools of architecture were gathered from all across Pakistan. This time the initiative was aimed to orchestrate an international conference on architectural education in October 2014; with the agenda of improving the current architectural curriculum in Pakistan. With the input of various heads of school of architecture, a preliminary foundation was laid and objectives for the upcoming international conference were identified and debated.
Chairman BAE, Ar. Murad Jamil introduced a scheme for developing the goals of this international conference which included;
• HoD conferences
• Faculty training programmes
• Fellowship and award programmes
• Student exchange programmes
• Student charrettes, etc.
Apart from determining a framework of the in¬ternational conference other productive ideas were also floated;
• Organize a HoD’s conference on curriculum devel¬opment with the participation of foreign delegates who are well versed in issues related to architec¬tural education in Pakistan and the rest of the world.
• Conduct mid-level teacher training. Gather faculty members from 20 (+-) schools of architecture to be jointly instructed by, foreign and local instructors.
• Establish links with other local and foreign uni¬versities through faculty exchange programmes and lecture series.
• Explore dual degree programmes such as 3+2 and 3+2+1, to tackle the ‘mushroom growth’ phenom-enon being experienced by many Asian countries.
• Design a sustainable model of awards and scholarships for educationists and students, in order to highlight the significant contributions of the academia in architectural education.
• Introduce supplementary courses such as archi¬tectural photography and journalism to broaden career options for the students.
• Launch a magazine comprising student thesis pro¬jects from architecture schools across Pakistan.
• Setup a database of experts for students searching for external thesis advisors.
• Create a website to share objectives, curricu¬lum and handouts amongst all the architectural schools.
• Facilitate juror training.
• Scholarships for educationists and students, in order to highlight the significant contributions of the academia in architectural education.
• Introduce supplementary courses such as archi¬tectural photography and journalism to broaden career options for the students.
• Launch a magazine comprising student thesis pro¬jects from architecture schools across Pakistan.
• Setup a database of experts for students searching for external thesis advisors.
• Create a website to share objectives, curricu¬lum and handouts amongst all the architectural schools.
• Facilitate juror training.


35thARCASIA Committee Of Architecture Education Meeting, KL, Malaysia – June 2014


(The summary has been extracted from the minutes of 35th ACAE Meeting authored by Dr. Walaiporn Nakapan, Honorary Secretary of ACAE.)
The 35th ARCASIA Committee of Architecture Education (ACAE) meeting was held on the 24th of June 2014 in Kuala Lumpur Malaysia. 22 delegates from 16 countries (Bangladesh, China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, India, Japan, Korea, Macao, Malaysia, Nepal, Philippines, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam) attended the meeting. Pakistan was represented by Ar. Murad Jamil (Chairman BAE-IAP) and Ar. Nosheed Ullah Shah. Each country was asked to present a report on the following:
• History of architectural education
• Institution of architects
• Summary of architecture school programmes
• Registration and license requirement
• Accreditation body and its status
• Key issues in architectural education
• Future plans
• Potential for student exchange programmes
• CPD programme
• Condition of the student internship programme
• University and contact list

The delegates shared the problems and their potential solutions with one another. The teacher per student ratio in architecture schools was also discussed. Student Jamboree and Competition manuals were re¬viewed and separated. Malaysia, Pakistan, and Indonesia, were requested to submit pictorial records of the previous student jamborees and com¬petitions. Nuno Soares - Deputy Chairman ACAE - presented a report on the preparation and progress of the Virtual Pilot Workshop ‘ARCASIA Pavillon’ based on the concept paper drafted by Dr. Kemas Ridwan Kurniawan (IAI). The participants include Macau (AAM), Korea (KIRA), Indonesia (IAI), Philippines (UAP), Pakistan (IAP) and India (IIA). It was also agreed that the Architecture Research Journal (ARJ) should empha¬size not only on theory but also practice, thus differentiating it from other Journals. Progress of the Architectural Timeline Chart and Architectural School Directory of each country was discussed; tasks and deadlines were assigned. ACAE also decided to continue the effort towards materializing and expanding the Cross Border Internship Programme. In this regard each member Institute was requested to list 10 architecture firms who are interested in participating in the programme.


BAE-IAP Second Faculty Training Workshop – October 2014


(The summary has been extracted from an article previously published in Archi Times during the year 2014. Ar. Aasma Talat, Ar. Sofia Wanchoo Mir and Ms. Wajeeha Akram have authored the original article.)
Based on the success of the First Faculty Training Workshop conducted by BAE-IAP in July 2013, Chairman BAE, Ar. Murad Jamil took the initiative for a second time in October (20th-24th) 2014. 46 young faculty members representing 22 architecture schools from all over Pakistan were gathered at COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, in Islamabad.
Professor Nuno Soares and Dr. Thomas Daniell from Saint Joseph University, Macau were invited once again to conduct the workshop which was titled “Designing the Design Studio II”.
The programme was structured around the design of a reading room for the purpose of study and dialogue. The schedule included precedent studies, site reading and analysis - to be conducted in COMSATS - volumetric studies and form generation, schematic design of study models, materials, structure, presentation techniques and detailed design. Finally, at the end of the workshop, participants were asked to present their work in Pecha Kucha format.
The instructors also presented various relevant case studies throughout the workshop. Some were pro¬jects designed and constructed by them, while others were mere inspiration. Even though the workshop was an extension of the previous one, the more extensive prac¬tical aspect allowed the participants to experiment and explore with their design models. Many participants felt like they were reliving their student days as they crafted physical models and demonstrated their progress in pin-up juries and presentations. Professor Nuno Soares expressed his awe on the caliber of the participants this year around who did not cease to impress him throughout the workshop.



BAE-IAP International Conference On Architectural Education – December 2014


(The summary has been extracted from an article previously published in Architecture, Design, Art (ADA, 8(29) dur¬ing the year 2015. Ar. Eman Aurangzeb Khan has authored the original article.)
The International Conference on Architectural Education in Pakistan was held on Friday, December 19th thru Sunday, December 21st 2014 at the Marriott Hotel in Islamabad. The conference titled “Connecting the Disconnects” aimed to bridge the gap between “learning and practice”. This event was organized as a result of the HoDs Roundtable Conferences held by the Board of Architectural Education (BAE) - Institute of Architects Pakistan (IAP) in April 2013 and March 2014. The Roundtables proposed to bring together noted architects and educationists on a single platform for the enhancement of the system of architectural education in Pakistan.
Recently, architecture commu¬nity all over the world has felt the need to re-think architectural education. The European continent is struggling to con¬form to the standardized models that have come about as a result of the Bologna Process. Pakistan and other South Asian countries have also felt the need to take certain measures in this part of the world. Despite historic, cultural and contextual differences, there is one thing everyone can agree on: the system needs a serious overhaul. Chairperson of the BAE-IAP hoped that the discourse will help to ex¬plore “what we have achieved, what we lack and what is the way forward”.
The format and structure of the conference provided opportunities for longer discussion during intervals and social events stretched over the three days. This resulted in a sense of community, support and constructive feedback for the speakers. An accomplished group of 34 delegates from Pakistan and other coun¬tries (Bangladesh, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Turkey and USA) attended the event. The conference managed to initiate a dis¬course where ideas, policies and strategies were discussed. It highlighted the role of educationists, practicing architects and students in changing the face of architec¬ture in the country.
The International Conference on Architectural Education laid a solid foundation for other similar gatherings which can examine the discourse in further depth. It empowered the architecture community of Pakistan to take decisions and implement pol¬icies which can ensure better connectivity among architectural practice, research and pedagogy; connect the disconnected. THUS, a major per-centage of this journal - what (mostly) follows - is dedicated to the findings of the papers that were presented at the conference. The papers are NOT arranged in the same order in which they were presented. Instead, the section was based on a narrative designed to maintain flow of information to facilitate connections and comparisons.